Reviews

RAW BLUE

“Kirsty Eagar’s fearless Raw Blue (Penguin), a story of regeneration set on Sydney’s northern beaches, is much more than just a promising debut: this one delivers.” Mike Shuttleworth, Australian Book Review: Best Books of 2009 – Critics’ Choices, No. 317

Raw Blue is a debut novel by Sydney-based writer Kirsty Eagar and while it has been sold into the Young Adult market it easily crosses over into adult territory. It’s a gutsy and nuanced story of Carly, surfer by day and cook by night, who is trying to find a place where she belongs, other than the waves. If you liked Tim Winton’s Breath, especially his descriptions of waves, water and surfing, then you must read this book.” Readings, Port Melbourne, 13th November, 2009

 “A memorable first book by a writer who gives an honest approach to what young adults face while growing up – and growing wiser.” Woman’s Day, 10th August, 2009

 “It’s an emotionally rich and powerful first novel and Kirsty Eagar is a writer to watch.” Canberra Times, 25th July, 2009

“The novel is full of a range of emotions, expressed honestly and without fear. The characters are believable and real, awkward and endearing. It is a compelling first novel for an exciting new Australian author….Recommended for senior high school students.” Reading Time, Vol 53, No 4

 “It’s dark subject matter, but Eagar manages to make it uplifting.” Sunday Mail, 5th July, 2009

 “If you only read one book this year … it should be Kirsty Eagar’s Raw Blue … one of those kept-me-up-all-night novels that stays in your bones and sings in your ears long after you’ve finished it. It wouldn’t be out of place next to Tim Winton’s Breath, except this is the ocean as healer, not as an object to be conquered, or the site of self-destruction, of risk. The images crackle, the lines are full of the poetry of observation, the story is searing, gutting, beautiful. This should be compulsory reading for all teenagers – especially boys.” julialawrinson.livejournal.com

“Mate, Raw Blue is so Australian, hey? It is also so authentic that I experienced little pools of tension in my gut and tiny bubbles of hope that Carly would be okay. A powerful, raw and beautiful novel that now sits proudly on my all time faves shelf.” inkcrush

“Kirsty Eagar’s first novel explores dark territory with skill and sensitivity.” Sunday Age, 5th July, 2009

“This very moving book for older teenagers broaches the timely and complex issue of non-consensual group sex…Eagar deals with this difficult subject with great sensitivity…” Sunday Telegraph, 5th July, 2009

“Raw Blue is a great read dealing with heart-wrenching and confronting issues many teenagers face today in a delicate and thought-provoking manner.” Manly Daily, 10th July, 2009

“Raw Blue can be described in one word – powerful. It’s a truly impressive debut work – dark, full of turmoil, with the occasional cloud break, just like the ocean.” Persnickety Snark, 8th July, 2009

“Kirsty Eagar’s debut novel is contemporary and relevant…I read this book feverishly, desperate for a happy ending…Eagar gives victims a voice.” Newcastle Herald, 11th July, 2009

“It’s a girl-meets-boy, emotional and sexual insight into the mind and methodology of a young woman and frothing surfer.” Surfing World, Issue 295, July 2009

“This is a psychologically intense novel that involves even non-surfing readers in the release Carly feels when conquering the waves, and offers sufficient insight that we empathise with her in the long battle between desire and fear on the path to self-acceptance.” Jo Goodman, Magpies, volume 24

“Raw Blue is a very good read regardless of whether or not you are interested in this particular genre. Kirsty Eagar very effectively writes in an engaging way that successfully draws the audience into Carly’s world. The novel addresses pertinent issues for teenagers today but because of some of the subject material, it would suit older readers. It would be an ideal addition to school libraries and a wide reading program. It could be incorporated into a unit on identity or discovery for older readers.” mETAphor

 

 

 

 

 

 

.